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Phantom Pain and Prosthetics

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What is Phantom Sensation and Phantom Pain?

They areTwo different things


Fri Nov 28 07:58:19 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Sat Nov 22 23:58:32 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:

Hi Everybody,

I would just to add my slant to what Rusty said. We both stood in aught to watch this young
SAK man walk so well and perform so will on this six mile trip. Both of us were exhausted
by the time we were through and he acted like the Energizer Bunny and just kept going
and going. I hope that when I get prophesies after my amputation, I can walk half that well.

Roxann

Sun Nov 23 09:38:07 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:

Dear Carol, Can you be a little bit more specific about your pictures. I really don't know
what you mean to say. To get in and out of your chair when you want to be on the floor you
first of all need to have strong arms. Just let yourself slip out of the chair and carefully
lower yourself to the ground. When you want to get in your chair you can do it the opposite
way but ALWAYS MAKE SURE THAT YOUR FRONTWHEELS ARE POINTING
FORWARD! If you can't manage it this direct way you can do it by making a "stop over'
on a lower chair or table. About going into the bath tub. It's quite easy. Roll your chair
close to the tubside make a transfer so you sit on the side of the tub and take with your
other hand the other side. Than lower yourself into the tub. To get out raise yourself with
your arms on the tubside but first make sure this side is dry. If you put a towel over it you
have a kind of an anti slip surface and than you can make the transfer. Raising from the
tub is easier than it looks because the upward force of the water will help you. Bye for
now. John

Tue Nov 25 14:00:50 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:

Hello, everybody!

I'm not an amputee, just a devotee, so I'm not an expert on this, but I have come across a
couple of double amps who used skatebaords to get around. One of the primary
advantages is that you can carry a skateboard up and down stairs, etc. One young man
was on a bus I boarded. When he got to his stop (ehich was also my stop) he just sccoted
down the aisle of the bus on his hands and butt, went on down the stairs carrying his
skateboard, tossed it on the sidewalk at the bottom of the stairs and landed on it and took
off (slightly downhill) faster than I could walk. Another advantage of the 'board is that
people perceive it as less a symbol of infirmity than a wheelchair -- it's a sports toy for
two-legged folks. Using a skateboard is, however, one of the few places where long stumps
are a disadvantage.

David Willoughby dwilloughby@ucsd.edu

Wed Nov 26 14:55:48 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:



Wed Nov 26 22:58:52 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:

Dear David W.,

Thank you for responding to my posting on amputees on scateboards. I really appreciate
you insight and observation of the young man on the skateboard and the bus. From your
description it sounded like using a skateboard is comfortable. It appears to be very
practical way for an DAK to get around.

Roxann

Wed Nov 26 23:52:07 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:

In Australia, DAKs use skateboards around their usual shopping areas. Likewise at a
sporting meet, where the DAKs have boards at hand to express run to another spot.

Tracey, a congenital DAK with an AE as well, is a Paralympic Gold medal swimmer; she
uses a skatboard, and I have never seen her in a wheelchair. When she was interviewed
on TV after her win, she just walked on hand and bum, accompanied by her boyfriend. She
has stumps about 8 " long.

Skateboards are a natural for DAKs.

Kent


Sat Nov 29 14:05:44 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


I heard some for topic phantom pains.

A friend of me lost the left leg 23 years ago. The doctor detected a tumor in the knee. My friend was at first very much shocked. He decided later a day for the immediate amputation. I as Wannabe interrogated of course him round around its amputation and the results. He told to me except for the operation pains, he did never again some pain since the amputation in his stump. I know the surgeon, that amputated personally. He was doctor on emergency call in his young years at the fire department Munich, and is now but already pensioned some years.

My friend has already always used a prosthesis since his amputation. He says he never has problems in the stump because of the prosthesis. In this way, he can walk very well without problems. I also have him never seen without prosthesis. He speaks about its amputation and the stump. But he is ashamed without prosthesis to be seen.

About one year ago, I saw a professor, expert for pains in the German television. The conversation contained in particular with phantom pain in the case of amputees. He meant to search in an inappropriate amputation for the main cause for phantom pain.

That was the drift of what he said: "The patient to be amputated receives a full narcosis. Therefore, he can observe nothing conscious, can also observe no pains. But during the amputation, many nerve ropes become completely separated. As a result, very strong pains which these nerves send to the brain result explosively. This announcement accepts the brain but nothing gets the consciousness of the patient from that.
Pain information burns as it were itself in the brain. This pain information anchored in the brain must incorporate the consciousness of the patient later, too often only after years. Then feel the amputee the phantom pain".

The professor then explained a means with which he could gain very good experiences:"The link to be amputated, must be anaesthetized locally very well in the place where it should be separated. As a result, the nerves can not send the pain during complete separation to the brain.
It is inexplicable but the fewest surgeons also give this local anesthetization in addition to the full narcosis".

According to the professor, later ones are so good phantom pains as excluded. This professor was presented as the leading German pain expert.

I know precisely it no more, however I believe the professor was from the university Heidelberg.

However, I don't know whether it is really the solution this means in the case of the problem phantom pain. But means includes already a certain logic for me.

Somebody is perhaps here with us, which also has experience and can say something to this .

Have a good day
regards

Paul




Fri Dec 05 12:22:32 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear John:

How are you today?

Derik
rri@neosoft.com


Fri Dec 05 14:15:01 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Derik,
I feel pretty uncomfortable.
regards,
john


Fri Dec 05 22:13:01 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear John:

Hope that you are feeling better soon.

Derik
rri@neosoft.com


Fri Dec 12 09:46:09 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:




Sun Dec 14 09:47:14 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Ascot Letters:


Dear John,
I hope you had a safe journey back home in the bad weather we had last week.
I am very happy with the new leg you made for me and that you were willing to fit me with
your new "3S" socket.
I never felt comfortable when I used my Sabolich Cad-Cam socket but thanks to your new
design I even can sit without pain.
I am so glad that there is a big chance I do not need any additional amputation anymore.
Both Andre and I have to thank you that you could fit us so quickly, altough we know you
have a waiting list. We think you deserve more recognition from everyone who is
interested in well-designed prosthesis.
Thank you very much again.
Marie-Louise


Fri Dec 19 07:06:12 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:




Mon Dec 22 08:30:51 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


I wish all readers and contributors of the Ascot Phantom Pain and prosthetics page

A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR

John


Mon Dec 29 19:29:41 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


I just thought Id give my 2 cents on phantom pain.
its been 2 mos since my surgery (BK amp) and the phantoms get less and less and are almost gone altogether but when they do hit, they feel just like an electrical shock from a wall outlet.

Ive read letters on the internet on how to stop them and some people think you should, in your mind exercise the missing limb and flex the muscles etc. I find this makes it worse. Ive adopted the idea that my leg is gone, there is nothing to move or exercise anymore so get used to the fact that there is nothing there. With nothing there, there should be no pain. This is just a mind excercise and it seems to work.

Keep the rubber side down
San Diego Harley dude


Wed Dec 31 00:42:52 CST 1997

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:




Sat Jan 03 21:51:11 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:




Sun Jan 04 15:42:56 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear everybody,
Good evening,

I'm Alex from the Belgium Ascot world (devotees & wannabees)
Hi John, everything ok with you ?
Roxann, I see you are here, everything Ok with you to ?
I wish everybody a verry happy 1998, and John, Roxann, and
others, if you wanna enjoy again our Belgium site again,
please do it, always welkom !!!

Kind Regards.
Alex (ASCOT BELGIUM)
xxx


Wed Jan 14 12:30:10 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hey
i am looking for information about pain after brachial palsy.
Can you give me some information
albrecht.marignoni@stud.uni-hannover.de


Sat Jan 17 02:20:06 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hallo
ich bin nicht amputiert, mein linker Arm ist navch einem Unfall kmplett gelähmt.
Ich habe phantomschmerzen und bitte um Informationen, ob nach jemand nach seiner Amputation aus gleichem Grund eine Prothese nutzen kann.
Albrecht.Marignoni@stud.uni.hannover.de


Sat Jan 17 02:24:35 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hey
I am looking for people with an amramputation after an accident talking about prosthesis and more
I am 29 years old and I am living in Germany
albrecht.marignoni@stud.uni-hannover.de


Sat Jan 17 02:24:49 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hey
I am looking for people with an amramputation after an accident talking about prosthesis and more
I am 29 years old and I am living in Germany
albrecht.marignoni@stud.uni-hannover.de


Wed Jan 21 06:14:10 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Hi!

My name is Didier and I'm a belgian devotee (Hello Alex!)
I've always been very interested by the amputee women who are wearing a peg leg.
May I have reactions or experiences of peg-legged women? What kind of shoe could you wear with your peg? Do you wear when you walk in the street?
What kind of clothing do you wear with your peg? Is there any advantages to have a peg leg?

Thanks for your answers!


Didier (Raven@cyber66.fidmel.be)


Tue Feb 24 18:06:59 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Lieber Albrecht,
ich bin ein LAE Amputierter und verlor me linken Arm als Resultat eines Ellbogentumors. Die Amputation ist vor 3 Jahren erfolgt,und ich kann heute sagen, dass ich mich in der Welt bestens zurecht finde. Das Handicap ist für mich nur noch marginal. man gewöhnt sich eben an alles. Phantomschmerzen hatte ich nur während etwa 8 Monaten, und die waren tolerierbar. Ich muss sagen, dass meine Amputation auf meinen Wunsch in Spinalanästhesie und einer sehr guten Lokalanästhesie erfolgte. Der Oberarmstumpf ist nun gute 20 cm lang und funktioniert bestens als Hebelarm für das Festhalten von allerlei Gegenständen unter dem Arm.Sogar mein Liebesleben erfuhr eine Verbesserung, da ich bis heute mehrere Frauen traf, die den Amputationsstumpf sexy finden.Allerdings muss man sein Schicksal akzeptieren und seine Amputation als etwas besonderes schätzen lernen. In Deinem Fall musst Du Dir überlegen,ob ein lahmer Arm nicht nur eine Behinderung der Aktivität darstellt.Besonders wenn Du Schmerzen hast, tust Du gut daran mit Deinen Ärzten zu sprechen , und eine Oberarmamputation zu diskutieren. Es ist jedenfalls leichter, einen Stumpf zu manipulieren als einen lahmen Arm. Ein Bekannter von mir, der nach einem Hirnschlag seinen linken Arm überhaupt nicht mehr gebrauchen konnte, wurde schliesslich nach langem Hin und Her amputiert und ist nun mehr als zufrieden, weil er weder Schmerzen noch eine Behinderung mehr empfindet. Er hatte allerdings alle Mühe, den Chirurgen zu überzeugen.

Grüsse aus der Schweiz Urs


Tue Feb 24 18:10:45 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Lieber Albrecht,
ich bin ein LAE Amputierter und verlor me linken Arm als Resultat eines Ellbogentumors. Die Amputation ist vor 3 Jahren erfolgt,und ich kann heute sagen, dass ich mich in der Welt bestens zurecht finde. Das Handicap ist für mich nur noch marginal. man gewöhnt sich eben an alles. Phantomschmerzen hatte ich nur während etwa 8 Monaten, und die waren tolerierbar. Ich muss sagen, dass meine Amputation auf meinen Wunsch in Spinalanästhesie und einer sehr guten Lokalanästhesie erfolgte. Der Oberarmstumpf ist nun gute 20 cm lang und funktioniert bestens als Hebelarm für das Festhalten von allerlei Gegenständen unter dem Arm.Sogar mein Liebesleben erfuhr eine Verbesserung, da ich bis heute mehrere Frauen traf, die den Amputationsstumpf sexy finden.Allerdings muss man sein Schicksal akzeptieren und seine Amputation als etwas besonderes schätzen lernen. In Deinem Fall musst Du Dir überlegen,ob ein lahmer Arm nicht nur eine Behinderung der Aktivität darstellt.Besonders wenn Du Schmerzen hast, tust Du gut daran mit Deinen Ärzten zu sprechen , und eine Oberarmamputation zu diskutieren. Es ist jedenfalls leichter, einen Stumpf zu manipulieren als einen lahmen Arm. Ein Bekannter von mir, der nach einem Hirnschlag seinen linken Arm überhaupt nicht mehr gebrauchen konnte, wurde schliesslich nach langem Hin und Her amputiert und ist nun mehr als zufrieden, weil er weder Schmerzen noch eine Behinderung mehr empfindet. Er hatte allerdings alle Mühe, den Chirurgen zu überzeugen.

Grüsse aus der Schweiz Urs


Wed Mar 04 13:07:46 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hello, i am a lower leg amputee. my leg was severely broken and later amputated below the knee in a motorbike accident.
this happened six months ago and i deal often daily with phantom pain. i am now taking a drug called tagratol and accompanied with acupuncture it has helped quite a bit.
it certainly hasnt stopped it altogether. if anybody would
like to talk and discuss phantom pain or amputee's problems feel
free to email me at awanker@hotmail.com. I AM CANADIAN! and proud of it.
scott


Wed Mar 04 19:45:08 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Scott:

From what I have heard about phatom pain, the best thing
that you might do is find a lady friend to do some deep
massage. Apparently this works because it loosens the scar
tissue which continually wants to attach to various places.
Many prosthetic people beleive that deep massage will help
relieve phantom pain. Hope this helps.

Derik Rawson
rri@neosoft.com


Thu Mar 05 16:23:19 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Derik,
Thanx for suggestion. My wife is somewhat apprehensive to touch my
residual limb.....so I suppose I should find another female...any suggestions???? haha
i will and have been massaging the scar tissue, but I do find it causes phantom sensations when
manipulated so I tend not to (massage it roughly).
I will attempt a tougher massage tonight.

Scott
awanker@hotmail.com


Sat Mar 07 07:09:51 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Scott:

The deep massage has to be fairly vigorous to break up the
scar tissue and it can be quite painful, but afterwards the
phanton pain is much relieved.

Derik Rawson
rri@neosoft.com

PS I know that you are Canadian, and there is a big French-
Canadian broohah at the moment, but you might start looking
for a "French psychiatrist" ...lol.

I lived in Paris, France for awhile and instead of
psychiatrists, they have believe in having lovers to help
you with your problems both physical and mental.....lol.
Somehow, I think their system works better in that regard
at least. No need for a real psychiatrist or a physical
therapist if you have a great affair going. Please tell
your wife to forgive me for mentioning it...lol and tell her
that residual limbs are sexy. Some of the girls on this
list who admire amputee men will tell you that.





Sat Mar 07 07:50:08 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Scott:

Received your picture and placed it at:

http://www.neosoft.com/~ascot/scottw.jpg

All you do is enter the above address below when you send
a message and your picture will appear below your message.

Derik
rri@neosoft.com


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Tue Mar 10 04:17:16 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


There are a new German homepage for disabeld people
http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/7681/index.html


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Tue Mar 10 04:20:09 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Für Amputierte und Schmerzpatienten gibt es eine neue Homepage in deutscher Sprache
Adresse: http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/7681/index.html


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Fri Mar 13 12:20:18 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Hello Derik,
To tell you the truth, i did have a french therapist. she was giving me a massage technique called Bowen Therapy. She is very beautiful, short with full lips and dark hair. Unfortunalely, her Bowen therapy didnt seem to affect my phantom pains, but just having her touch me made me feel better. of course, my wife has the same affect......

Has anybody tried Bowen therapy with any success.
My acupuncture seems to be helping (coupled with tagratol)
Scott


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Mon Mar 16 14:49:08 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


G'day

The topic below came up in another amputee forum recently, and I can't resist the urge to mention it.

Medical marijuana has been a popular topic of conversation and political action lately, though it is rarely mentioned in connection with amputees. I've been a NON-medical marijana smoker for many years myself, and I was quite surprised a couple of years ago, when I mentioned the topic to a seemingly fairly conservative amputee acquaintance and she said: "Oh yes, I smoke it from time to time. It really helps with my pain." As it turned out, most of her pain was back pain from being asymmetrical and walking on crutches and stump pain from sitting on her amputated hip for too long, not phantom pain per se. But she definitely claims that it helps.

Some time after that, another friend who had lost her arm fairly recently mentioned the problems she had been having with phantom pain. I told her about my other friend's marijuana experience, and she said that she had smoked it many years before as a teenager, but it had never occurred to her to try it for pain relief. I gave her a little to try later, and when I asked about the results a month or so afterward, she said, "No, it didn't make the pain go away, really, but it made me a lot less concerned about it -- it was just a sensation, not a bother.

So, do what you will with this information. I'm not a doctor, so I can't make a professional recommendation for "medical marijuana." I should add that marijuana does have side effects! It can make you laugh much more easily than usual, and make it harder to take things seriously. And it can significantly reduce your ability to concentrate. Plus, you usually smoke it, so there are the incumbent negative effects on your respiratory system. All in all, thougm, I feel that it's much less nasty a subnstance than either alcohol or tobacco -- not nerarly as addicitive as either, and without the severe side effects that result frorm overindulgence in booze.

While I usually sign my messages, I think I'll go anonymous this time, just in case there are any narcs lurking out there.


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Wed Mar 18 09:45:20 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


After eight years of surgery, hospitals, total bed care in many attempts to save my left leg from the ravages of osteomyelitis, I am now sheduled to have above the knee amputation next month. I wonder if there is any national group or foundation or whatever with people who can help the pre-amputee. Half the time I'm ready to accept amputation, and half the time I,m in total denial. I feel very alone in this since I live in rural Maine, and there seem to be no support groups around here. I would appreciate anything anyone could tell me.


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Fri Mar 20 13:14:33 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Friend,

You will find a lot of people here to build a good support system with. So keep checking these "live chat" pages.

I have not been where you are going; however I have lost an eye to cancer, and I understand the denial vs acceptance quandry you are experiencing.

My prayers are with you.

Bob ;-)


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Fri Mar 20 17:17:06 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Bob, thank you so much for ansering my message. It was really hard for me to write my feelings downabout my up-comming amputation. I was really frightened to reveal my feelings, but now Im really glad I did. Actually, my M.D. suggested that I get a computer ,&get on the internet. He had said there would be quite a few people I'd be able to communicate with. No matter what the disability, I think it's really important tokeep in touch with & stay in touch with others who are going through similar problems. I feel it doesn't have to necessarily have to be "leg to leg" "eye to eyr" "arm toarm" e.t.c. but for any one having or has had an amputation, including an eye enucleation. I'd love to hear from you again Bob and any one else out there about your experiences thanks so much!!! Scout


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Sat Mar 21 12:43:13 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Scout,

I am glad you respomnded so quickly. Usually I only post on the Ascot general topic live chat page. I have met about 15 or so of the people who post face to face, and I have found that their postings reflect very accurately their personalities in real life. One advantage of these pages is that you can reveal as much as you want, or you can withold as mech as you want.

One of the first things I did when I realized that I had a serious vision problem was to build a supprot system. I found the members of my support system in my church, other churches, family, friends, and even complete strangers that I have never met.

The support system will give you people to "lean on", people you can express your hopes and fears to, people who will ride with you as you go your appointments, people that you can "bounce" ideas off of as you consider your various options. Christopher Reeve has built a support system wich includes some fameous people and probably a lot of ordinary people, while, my supprort system was made up of ordinary people. Both Christopher and I have benifitted greatly from our systems, and you will do the same as you go in this direction.

Acceptance vs. denial: I am going to give to you my own personel clechet, "What ever is, is, and wishing it wasn't, doesnt change a damn thing!" I must have repeated that to myself and others a million times in the past, and I still do in the presant.

You can e-mail me with complete confidence at: Rnitsua@aol.com

Bob ;-)


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Sun Mar 29 20:55:42 CST 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


hey anomonous drug smoker
sorry about title. i occasionally smoke a little weefer myself. my brothers and father love it. my wife doesnt. in fact my marriage was a little shaky b/c of it so i gave it up...except on rare occasions.
here's the story on phantom pain. when i do smoke it, i never smoke it b/c of the pain but b/c its a good oppurtunity to have some fun or relax with friends (or when no chance of seeing my wife exists)
but i dont ever remember having pains when stoned. i will try to see if sensations or pains occur at any time in any future pow wows though and give feedback here.
it always puts a smile on my face though.
scott


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Fri Apr 24 20:01:28 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:




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Sun Jun 14 14:36:28 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Hello All,
I have been a single AK for almost two years now. The only relief that I have found from Phantom pain is a Tens unit. I wear it every night and it seems to do the trick. It takes about a week of constant use to get total relief. I have tried to stop useing it on ocasion but always return. I think the electrical activity somehow scrambles the pain messages that are sent from the brain...... Hope this helps


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Mon Jul 13 15:56:26 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


I've been using a suction leg for around a year now and I'm getting nowhere. If I walk more than a few yards at a reasonable pace, my leg gets sore at the top where the socket rubs. I've lost count of the number of adjustments I've had. And I've had probably six or seven new sockets too. None of this makes any difference. When I talk to my Prosthetist, he tells me soreness is a common problem. The fact is I'm beginning to feel there's no hope for an improvement. I want to lead a healthy, full life but my leg holds me back all the time. I've got all the latest technology built into the leg but for all this, without a decent fit, it makes no difference. Lots of people claim to be able to walk 'all day' but when I question them further it invariably relates to casual ambling with lots of rests and normally on a flat surface. I want to be able to walk several miles and at a reasonable pace. Is there anyone out there with an above knee amputation who does this or am I just deluding myself by hoping this is possible. I'd really appreciate any feedback about this - good or bad. I feel really miserable because, at 36, I'm beginning to think I'll never be any better.

P.S. On the matter of phantom pain, try amytriptiline. It makes you a bit sleepy to start with but it's pretty good to help get over the initial phantoms.


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Mon Jul 13 16:00:50 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Further to the last message about soreness, anyone who wishes to reply can contact email mark@mareus.demon.co.uk.

Thanks.


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Wed Jul 15 14:37:59 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Mark:

Have you tried a prosthesist who uses the latest laser beam
computer technology to fit your socket? Apparently this
technology creates a near perfect fit. I am sure that there
is someome here who is an AK who can talk about this from
experience.

Derik Rawson
rri@neosoft.com


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Wed Jul 15 20:17:20 CDT 1998

Dear ASCOT LETTERS Phantom Pain and Prosthetics:


Dear Mark:

I just remembered that Susie McCann just had a big
success with a computer designed socket fit. I will see if
she will come here to talk with you about it.

Derik Rawson
rri@neosoft.com


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